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December 30, 2011

Exploring the moon

From The Sun's print editions:

Baltimore Sun reporter Candus Thomson offers this guest post:      

What is the moon made of and why have a dozen spacecraft crashed into its surface?

Two U.S. probes have been circling the moon in formation for 82 days, mapping its uneven gravitational pull. On New Year’s Eve, one will land followed a day later by the other.

The Grail probes, short for Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory, will study the moon from crust to core to help scientists learn how it was created. Research on the moon’s gravity field will help target safe-landing sites.

Reuters file photo

Posted by Kim Walker at 6:45 AM | | Comments (0)
Categories: From the Sun's print edition
        

December 29, 2011

Some flurries this afternoon

Today's forecast from the National Weather Service call for some flurries before 3 p.m. Some folks have already tweeted seeing some flakes in Hunt Valley.

From the National Weather Service: 

"A NEGATIVELY-TILTED LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM /BUILDING IN THE WAKE OF THE LOW THAT PASSED THE REGION ON TUESDAY NIGHT/ WILL PUSH EAST TO THE CENTRAL GREAT LAKES TODAY. THE UPR TROUGH WITH THIS LOW WILL EXTEND SOUTHEAST TO THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION. A WARM FRONT AHEAD OF THIS LOW WILL REACH EAST INTO THE NORTHERN MID-ATLANTIC REGION BY THIS AFTERNOON.  CLOUD COVER WILL PERSIST THROUGH THE DAY...LIMITING MAX TEMPS TO THE LOW TO MID 40S /UPR 40S FROM KCHO TO KEZF/.  RDR INDICATES LGT SNOW OVR THE ERN PANHANDLE IN ASSO W/ A MID- LEVEL TROUGH AXIS. HOWEVER WITH FORCING INCREASING TO THE NORTH AND A DRY SFC LAYER...ONLY SPRINKLES/FLURRIES ALONG THE MASON- DIXON LINE ARE CURRENTLY MENTIONED."

From Baltimore meteorologist Eric the Red:

"Some light snow is falling across northern MD courtesy of a slow-moving warm front. The snow is light, and is falling mainly north of DC and mostly west of I-95, but is kinda fun nevertheless. As far as accumulations go, none.  It's between 34 and 38°, so nothing will stick at those temps. However, models - which have totally missed this by the way - are now showing another round of light snow across central and nrn MD tonight ..., which might leave a dusting since temps will drop with sundown."
 

Posted by Kim Walker at 1:31 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Winter weather
        

Winter without any snow? Say it isn't so!

From The Sun's print editions:

Baltimore Sun reporter Candus Thomson offers this guest post:     

A caller left this message: When was the last time Baltimore went an entire winter without snow? Someone who wasn’t a stickler for detail would point out that we had snow on Oct. 29. But, technically that’s not winter, right? Well, according to the National Weather Service, Baltimore never went an entire season without snow. The closest we came was in 1949-50, when one-half inch fell. The 30-year average snow total for BWI-Marshall Airport is 20.2 inches. Last winter gave us 14.4 inches.

Posted by Kim Walker at 6:35 AM | | Comments (4)
Categories: From the Sun's print edition
        

December 28, 2011

Stargazing tool

From The Sun's print editions:

Baltimore Sun reporter Candus Thomson offers this guest post:    

Were you one of the planet's fortunate creatures to receive an iPad for Christmas of Hanukkah? If you did and you consider yourself something of a stargazer, you might find the app, Star Walk, a fun download.

The app turns an iPad into an astronomy guide, using the device's camera to help search the galaxy and identify features. There's also a version for the iPhone. Star Walk tracks satellites and provides information about what’s up.

Posted by Kim Walker at 6:00 AM | | Comments (2)
Categories: From the Sun's print edition
        

December 26, 2011

A Christmas memory

From the Sun's print editions:

Baltimore Sun librarian Paul McCardell provides this guest post:  

It was Christmas Eve 1966 and my brother and sisters and I had all gone to sleep dreaming that Santa would soon arrive.

It was perfect weather. Several inches of snow had fallen that day and flurries were still blowing.

When we awoke there was much excitement, for my sisters hollered that they saw on the roof what looked like boot prints, reindeer tracks and sled markings. To our surprise my father retrieved a reindeer collar with bells, which we were convinced belonged to Rudolph. We cherish that memory and pass it down.

Merry Christmas.

Posted by Kim Walker at 6:14 AM | | Comments (0)
Categories: From the Sun's print edition
        

December 24, 2011

Tracking Santa with NORAD

From The Sun's print editions:

Baltimore Sun reporter Candus Thomson offers this guest post:    

It's time to track Santa's approach to the Greater Baltimore metro area. Doing the honors as it has every year since 1955 is NORAD, the North American Aerospace Defense Command, with help from private contributions.

It's worth every penny. According to the NORAD Santa website, the detection system consists of 47 radar installations, satellites with infrared sensors to detect the heat from Rudolph's red nose, high-speed Santa cams and chase planes.

To see all the ways you can follow along, Google: NORAD Tracks Santa.

Posted by Kim Walker at 6:28 AM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Sky Watching
        

December 23, 2011

Ursids meteor shower tonight

From The Sun's print editions:

Baltimore Sun reporter Candus Thomson offers this guest post:   

If the skies cooperate, we may be lucky enough to view the Ursids meteor shower tonight. The display is product of the comet 8P/Tuttle, which orbits the sun every 13.6 years.

It’s not a big event and the intensity of the fireballs often disappoint. But they move rather slowly and they might make a nice respite from the final hours of holiday wrapping, baking and cleaning.

If you're up past midnight go outside, take a deep breath of fresh air and look toward the North Star.

Posted by Kim Walker at 6:45 AM | | Comments (1)
Categories: From the Sun's print edition
        

December 22, 2011

Winter solstice arrived ... looking forward to spring

From The Sun's print editions:

Baltimore Sun reporter Candus Thomson offers this guest post:  

"A day without sunshine is like, you know, night," Steve Martin once said.

The winter solstice arrived in Baltimore at 12:30 a.m. At 9 hours, 24 minutes and 1 second, it is the shortest day of the year.

If you think it’s bad here, just remember those folks above a latitude of 66.5 degrees north. They’ll be in the dark all day.

But cheer up, the sun has already booked its return flight. Days will get longer and on March 20 at 1:14 a.m, the vernal equinox will arrive.

Posted by Kim Walker at 6:30 AM | | Comments (1)
Categories: From the Sun's print edition
        

December 21, 2011

White Christmas chances here and around the nation

 

The National Weather Service has up a handy U.S. map on chances of a white Christmas. The southern and eastern half of Maryland is coded with less than 10% chance and the central/western part is 10-25%. The early NWS forecast for the Baltimore area is cloudy with a high of 43.

Here's Baltimore meteorologist Eric the Red's latest take on Christmas weather: 

"A disturbance in the southern jet stream will race northeast off the Carolina coast, while another disturbance in the northern jet stream races by to our north.  These two features will remain separate (no phasing), and that as they say is that.  Christmas Day - as it looks now - will be breezy and cold.  If the northern-stream disturbance slows down or were track a bit farther south, then this would change.  But really, that's wish-casting."

Posted by Kim Walker at 1:35 PM | | Comments (1)
Categories: Winter weather
        

Rime ice is frozen fog

From The Sun's print editions:

Baltimore Sun reporter Candus Thomson offers this guest post:  

Looking at the website of New Hampshire’s Mount Washington Observatory ("home of the world's worst weather"), a reader saw a photo of rime ice and asked what causes it.

Here's the official "Obs" explanation: "Rime ice is essentially frozen fog. When temperatures dip below freezing, super-cooled water droplets suspended in the clouds freeze instantly upon contact with any solid object. When the droplets freeze, they can form delicate, feather-like structures that grow into the wind at a rate of up to a foot an hour."

Got weather questions? Ask them in the comments. 

Posted by Kim Walker at 6:30 AM | | Comments (0)
Categories: From the Sun's print edition
        

December 17, 2011

Snow flurries falling Saturday night

From Sun reporter Steve Kilar:

Scattered snow flurries will fall in the Baltimore and Washington metropolitan regions Saturday evening, according to a National Weather Service forecast from 7 p.m.

Some residents in Baltimore County reported seeing flurries early in the evening.

No accumulation is expected. Temperatures will drop to around freezing by 10 p.m. and there will be northwest winds of 10 to 15 mph, the forecast said.

A small watercraft advisory is in effect through Saturday night for the Chesapeake Bay south of Pooles Island, which is due east of downtown Baltimore.

Sunday is expected to be cloudy early, giving way to a mostly clear afternoon. There will be a north wind between 5 and 10 mph and the high is expected to be 42.

Posted by Jennifer Badie at 8:15 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Winter weather
        

Remembering the 'whiteout' of 2009

From the Sun's print editions:

Baltimore Sun librarian Paul McCardell provides this guest post: 

Do you remember the record snow of Dec. 18-19, 2009, which came on the last weekend before Christmas — one of the busiest shopping weekends of the year? Maryland was hit with 21.1 inches, putting a halt to shopping and keeping most people hunkered down.

This storm broke the previous December record of 14.1 inches set Dec. 11-12, 1960, and the all-time monthly record of 20.4 inches set in December 1966.

Despite the warning, the magnitude of the storm was still surprising. More surprises were ahead that winter, however, with the back-to-back storms of February 2010.

Posted by Kim Walker at 6:44 AM | | Comments (1)
Categories: From the Sun's print edition
        

Photos show beauty of our nation's parks

From The Sun's print editions:

Baltimore Sun reporter Candus Thomson offers this guest post:  

From the moody skies over the red ruins of Pecos Pueblo in New Mexico to a flock of birds wheeling in the fog over Pennsylvania’s Valley Forge, the essence of America's National Historic Landmarks was captured by hundreds of amateur and professional photographers in the 12th annual photo contest sponsored by the National Park Service.

Entries came from all 50 states and U.S. territories. The winning shot and the 12 honorable mentions along with the list of Maryland's 71 landmarks are on the agency's website (nationalparks.org).
 

Posted by Kim Walker at 6:04 AM | | Comments (0)
Categories: From the Sun's print edition
        

December 16, 2011

Tiny chance of flurries this weekend

Baltimore-based professional meteorologist Eric the Red sent us a head's up that there's a slight chance of flurries this weekend.

"Two chances for 'snow' (emphasize quote-unquote).  One is tonight, as a disturbance to our south produces some light rain and wet snow, [especially] south of Baltimore. A bit of a reprieve ... and then we could see some snow showers Saturday night." He adds, however, that if the light snow Saturday materializes, "it would do nothing more than coat the ground (and that's the "heavy" scenario)."

Some National Weather Service discussion about a clipper system heading toward the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states also mentions a chance for flurries Saturday night:

"THIS CLIPPER SYSTEM WILL NOT HAVE MUCH MOISTURE WITH IT...ALTHOUGH INCREASING DPVA AND A COUPLED-JET STREAK IS EXPECTED TO PROVIDE THE ADEQUATE SYNOPTIC LIFT FOR LGT PRECIP TO REACH THE ALLEGHENY AND POTOMAC HIGHLANDS. GIVEN LATEST QPF AMOUNTS AND A 15:1 SLR...1-2 INCHES OF SNOW COULD BE EXPECTED ACROSS THE WRN SLOPES OF THE ALLEGHENY FRONT. LGT ACCUMULATIONS UNDER ONE INCH ARE POSSIBLE FARTHER EAST ACROSS CENTRAL MD AND THE ERN WV PANHANDLE. WITH DOWNSLOPING W-NW FLOW...ANY SNOW SHOWER ACTIVITY WOULD HAVE A HARD TIME MAKING IT EAST OF THE BLUE RIDGE. STILL CANNOT RULE OUT AN ISOLD FLURRY REACHING THE CITIES. TEMPS SAT NGT WILL FALL BELOW FREEZING EXCEPT IN THE CITIES AND ALONG THE IMMEDIATE COAST."

 

Posted by Kim Walker at 4:58 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Winter weather
        

Glimpse the International Space Station this weekend

From The Sun's print editions:

Baltimore Sun reporter Candus Thomson offers this guest post: 

The International Space Station will make three evening appearances of at least three minutes this weekend in the skies above Baltimore.

The first fly-by comes Friday at 6:03, when the 400-ton ship enters from the south-southwest and moves toward the east, reaching a maximum elevation of 48 degrees.

On Saturday, it will appear lower in the southern sky at 5:08, moving to the east.

On Sunday at 5:49, the spacecraft will enter from west-southwest and depart into the northeast at a maximum elevation of 76 degrees.

Posted by Kim Walker at 6:36 AM | | Comments (0)
Categories: From the Sun's print edition
        

December 15, 2011

White Christmas? Probably not ...

From The Sun's print editions:

Baltimore Sun reporter Candus Thomson offers this guest post: 

Chances of a white Christmas this year are about as good as the Orioles making the 2012 playoffs, gas prices dipping below $3 a gallon or Donald Trump sporting a mohawk.

Based on history, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration puts Baltimore’s chance at 10 percent. Ditto the Farmer’s Almanac. The Weather Channel’s long-range forecast shows daily highs at about 50 degrees going into the holiday weekend. For a better than 50-50 chance, travel to northern New England or the Great Lakes region.

UPDATE: Here's what Baltimore professional meteorologist Eric the Red has to say about Christmas weather: 

"After looking like we would get colder and stormier for the end of December, models are backing off almost entirely of this idea. The north Atlantic high is now forecast to be farther south, making it the non-north Atlantic high ... and now, the models show a continuation of a low over Greenland. Classic North Atlantic Shop Vac -- the low to the north spinning counter clockwise, while the high to the south spins clockwise, and in between, a very fast west-to-east flow aloft -- sucking all the cold air out of North America.  We've avoided this for the last 2 winters (we've had a blocking high over Greenland or thereabouts), but I'm beginning to suspect it may end up being our fate this year.  ... If indeed this continues, we will not only see below-normal snowfall, we may struggle to get any snow at all.  ... El Nino and La Nina play a role, but for us, the money is in the North Atlantic Oscillation, which is essentially what we're talking about here."

Posted by Kim Walker at 12:08 PM | | Comments (1)
Categories: From the Sun's print edition, Winter weather
        

December 14, 2011

Don't forget about black ice

From The Sun's print editions:

Baltimore Sun reporter Candus Thomson offers this guest post: 

Some outlying areas have already experienced their first black ice of the season -- nasty stuff.

A reader left a message on the weather phone, asking how black ice differs from other icy forms.

The short answer is, it doesn't. It's frozen water that's arrived as rain, freezing rain, drizzle, or fog or as runoff that has refrozen. The thin veneer of ice over blacktop is hard to see, especially at night or in low-light conditions and announces its presence to unsuspecting motorists with startling authority.

Posted by Kim Walker at 6:30 AM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Winter weather
        

December 13, 2011

Snow contest begins: Send us your best guess

 

The snow contest is back by popular demand. Guess how many total inches of snow will accumulate this 2011-2012 season at BWI-Marshall Airport. Add your entry to comments below -- we'll count the ones that come in by the first measurable snowfall of the year. (So far only a trace has fallen at BWI.)

The winner(s), who guess the closest without going over, will get Baltimore Sun swag to be determined and, of course, blog bragging rights.

Some things to consider:

Last year's snowfall was 14.4 inches.

Here's Frank Roylance's winter weather outlook article from earlier this year.

Average monthly and seasonal snow totals.

Or you can take some advice from two-time weather contest winner Laura Kirk.

Good luck.  

Baltimore Sun file photo 

Posted by Kim Walker at 6:22 AM | | Comments (10)
Categories: Winter weather
        

December 12, 2011

Show off your photo skills

 

The winter chill hit in full force this weekend, inspiring the latest round of Reader SunShots' call for submissions.

If you have taken any photos that fit into this week's "cold" theme, submit them here to our gallery.  We will display the best photo online and in print on Monday, Dec. 26 with a critique from director of photography Bob Hamilton. Upload your images through Dec. 18.

Above: The first submission to this week's Reader SunShots by stanwoodswalker. 

Posted by Kim Walker at 12:26 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Readers' weather photos
        

December 9, 2011

Westminster Astronomy Club gathering

The Westminster Astronomy Club will be preparing star-gazers for the month's activities on Saturday night with a program at Soldiers Delight Natural Environment Area in Owings Mills.

The two-hour get together begins at 8 p.m. Club members will talk about the lunar eclipse and the Geminid Meteor shower, considered by many to be the best meteor show around. The radiant point for this shower will be in the constellation Gemini. Best viewing is usually to the east after midnight. The program is free.

Posted by Kim Walker at 6:48 AM | | Comments (2)
Categories: Sky Watching
        

December 8, 2011

More thoughts on the snow that wasn't

I heard from a reader who wondered what Baltimore professional meteorologist Eric the Red thought about yesterday's forecasts missing the mark. Perfect timing because I just heard from him:

"The killer with this event was the fact that the storm had zero wrap-around precip. Instead, there was a very sharp, linear north-south back edge to it ... so despite the fact that the changeover to snow occurred hours earlier than I thought, the pcp also ended hours earlier than I thought.  The net result:  a big swing and a miss. I guess if there's any consolation, it's that if you're gonna get one wrong, it might as well be an event where realistically we were looking at 1 to 2 inches, 3 tops."

Eric added some thoughts for the outlook for the rest of the month: 

"For what it's worth, took a look at some of the upper-air forecast charts, and it does not look good for snow fans for the rest of December.  Instead of a blocking high over the northern Atlantic - like we've had the past 2 winters - we have the exact opposite... a strong low.  With its strong counter clockwise spin, it tends to pull the cold air east out of North America and into northern Europe.  I affectionately call it the North Atlantic Shop Vac. ... So our already-low odds of a white Christmas are even lower.  ... "

Posted by Kim Walker at 2:57 PM | | Comments (1)
Categories: Winter weather
        

Rain and snow totals

While there wasn't much snow, there was record rainfall for Dec. 7 in Baltimore.

According to the National Weather Service, 2.38 inches fell, breaking the previous record for the date set in 1976 at  1.27 inches.

Across the region, observed overnight totals from the CoCoRaHS Network:

Waldorf:  4.18

Odenton: 2.73

North Laurel: 2.36

Catonsville: 2.12

Bel Air: 2:03

As far as snow goes, the National Weather Service measured 2 inches in Fort Ritchie in Frederick Washington County and 1 inch in Frostburg, Allegany County.

Posted by Kim Walker at 12:31 PM | | Comments (2)
Categories: Winter weather
        

Earliest sunset today

From The Sun's print editions:

Baltimore Sun reporter Candus Thomson offers this guest post: 

Who turned out the lights? The earliest sunset of the year occurs today in Baltimore at 4:43 p.m. EST. The precise moment varies with the latitude, while in the Southern Hemisphere's middle latitudes folks are waking up to their earliest sunrises.

Our gloom deepens at 12:30 a.m. on the 22nd, when winter arrives with the solstice. The time between sunrise and sunset will be 9 hours, 24 minutes and one second. Although the amount of daylight increases following the solstice, sunrise doesn’t start getting earlier until January.

Posted by Kim Walker at 6:30 AM | | Comments (0)
Categories: From the Sun's print edition
        

December 7, 2011

State urges precautions during winter weather

With the possibility of snow tonight, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is warning people to be prepared for winter weather.

Hypothermia contributed to 4 deaths in Maryland this fall, the department said, including 2 seniors (Montgomery and Allegany) and 2 adults (Harford and Wicomico).

The department makes the following tips:

Cover your head.
Wear several layers of lightweight, loose-fitting clothing to trap air for insulation
Cover your mouth with a scarf to protect lungs from direct cold air. Cover your ears and the lower part of your face, too.
Wear mittens rather than fingered gloves.
Wear warm leg coverings and heavy socks, or two pairs of lightweight socks.
Wear waterproof boots or sturdy shoes. 

DHMH also reminded people to be aware of the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning from heating devices.

Posted by Kim Walker at 2:30 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Winter weather
        

What's shallow fog?

From the Sun's print editions:

Baltimore Sun reporter Candus Thomson provides this guest post: 

A reader who just returned from overseas says she heard a term — shallow fog — she had never heard before back home and wanted to know what it is.

Fog consists of water droplets suspended in the air that look pretty unless you're driving a vehicle or boat through them. Shallow fog is a low-laying blanket, often extremely localized, that does not obstruct horizontal visibility at 6 feet or more above ground level, according to the National Weather Service. It usually burns off fairly quickly.

Posted by Kim Walker at 12:46 PM | | Comments (1)
Categories: From the Sun's print edition
        

Winter weather advisory tonight

Update 2: The northern part of Baltimore County is still under winter weather advisory with 1-2 inches in the forecast.

Update: The winter weather advisory has been cancelled.

Check out our latest weather story on The Breaking News blog. Forecasters are calling for 2 inches of rain, with a flood watch in effect until tonight.

There is also a winter weather advisory for the area. From the National Weather Service:

"WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 7 PM THIS EVENING TO 3 AM EST THURSDAY... * PRECIPITATION TYPE...RAIN CHANGING TO LOCALLY HEAVY WET SNOW. * ACCUMULATIONS...1 TO 2 INCHES. 2 TO 4 INCHES ACROSS THE HIGHER ELEVATIONS. * TIMING...RAIN CHANGES TO SNOW IN THE LATE EVENING. HEAVIEST SNOW AROUND MIDNIGHT. * TEMPERATURES...FALLING TO THE LOW TO MID 30S. * WINDS...NORTHWEST 15 TO 25 MPH WITH GUSTS UP TO 40 MPH. "

Posted by Kim Walker at 11:33 AM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Watches and warnings, Winter weather
        

December 4, 2011

Pearl Harbor weather history

 

From the Sun's print editions:

Baltimore Sun librarian Paul McCardell provides this guest post: 

As the nation pauses this week to remember the 70th anniversary of the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor, here is a glimpse into the weather that day.

In Baltimore, the air was chilly with a high of 44.

The first bombs fell on Pearl Harbor at 7:55 a.m. About a half hour earlier, the reading at the U.S. Weather station in downtown Honolulu, Hawaii, was 73 degrees. The skies over Pearl Harbor were partly cloudy with good visibility.

The normal high for Pearl Harbor in December is 81 and low 68. In Baltimore, the normal temp ranges from 45 to 28.

Let us pause and remember the sacrifices made that day, a day that changed the course of history.

File photo by STF/AFP/Getty Images

Posted by Kim Walker at 7:11 AM | | Comments (1)
Categories: From the Sun's print edition
        

December 3, 2011

Nov. 2011 was fifth warmest November

 

From The Sun's print editions:

Baltimore Sun reporter Candus Thomson offers this guest post: 

With an average monthly maximum temperature of 62 degrees, last month was the warmest November since 2001 registered 63.4 degrees, and the fifth warmest on record, the National Weather Service says. Only Nov. 18 failed to reach a daily maximum of 50 degrees.

Skies were partly cloudy (13 days), fair (10) and cloudy (7). It was drier than normal and the driest month since May. The outlook hasn’t changed for the next three months, with chances of above, normal or below temperatures and precipitation equally possible.

The women's track team from Loyola took advantage of the 70 + degree day Nov. 14 and ran along Greenway in Guilford. Baltimore Sun file photo by Gene Sweeney Jr.

Posted by Kim Walker at 7:02 AM | | Comments (0)
Categories: From the Sun's print edition
        

December 2, 2011

Stargazing events this weekend

From The Sun's print editions:

Baltimore Sun reporter Candus Thomson offers this guest post: 

There's two opportunities for stargazing with knowledgeable folks this weekend.

Tonight, the Community College of Baltimore County's astronomy program will point its telescope skyward for a free peak at the galaxy. The session at the Dundalk campus will start at 7 p.m. To confirm the sky is clear enough, call 443-840-4216 no earlier than 6:15 p.m.

On Saturday, the Westminster Astronomical Society is offering a 7:30 p.m. program at Carroll County’s Bear Branch Nature Center. The cost is $5; call 410-386-2103 to save a seat.

An earlier version listed the incorrect number for the CCBC program. The Sun regrets the error. 

Posted by Kim Walker at 6:39 AM | | Comments (0)
Categories: From the Sun's print edition
        

December 1, 2011

Remember Irene? NASA video shows life of the hurricane

Video from NASA's GOES-13 satellite covers the storm between Aug. 20-28.

Posted by Kim Walker at 3:47 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Hurricanes
        

Get a glimpse of the International Space Station

From The Sun's print editions:

Baltimore Sun reporter Candus Thomson offers this guest post: 

As you get ready for work or school tomorrow morning, dash outside at 6:33 and look to the northwestern skies as the International Space Station cruises by at more than 17,200 mph. At a duration of four minutes, the flyover will give you plenty of time to get your bearings.

The flying laboratory, in space for more than a decade, will visit again Sunday morning at 6:17, approaching from the west-north west. On board is NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, the commander, and two Russian cosmonauts.

Posted by Kim Walker at 6:00 AM | | Comments (1)
Categories: From the Sun's print edition
        
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About Frank Roylance
This site is the Maryland Weather archive. The current Maryland Weather blog can be found here.
Frank Roylance is a reporter for The Baltimore Sun. He came to Baltimore from New Bedford, Mass. in 1980 to join the old Evening Sun. He moved to the morning Sun when the papers merged in 1992, and has spent most of his time since covering science, including astronomy and the weather. One of The Baltimore Sun's first online Web logs, the Weather Blog debuted in October 2004. In June 2006 Frank also began writing comments on local weather and stargazing for The Baltimore Sun's print Weather Page. Frank also answers readers’ weather queries for the newspaper and the blog. Frank Roylance retired in October 2011. Maryland Weather is now being updated by members of The Baltimore Sun staff
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