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August 26, 2011

Baltimore now under Tropical Storm Warning

Hurricane Irene, packing 110 mph winds, heavy rain and a 4 to 8-foot storm surge, continues to bear down on eastern North Carolina, southeastern Virginia and Maryland this morning. Hurricane Warnings now stretch from North Carolina to New Jersey, including the Maryland and Delaware resorts.

Baltimore and the entire Western Shore of Maryland - and the Eastern Shore inland from the beaches, are under a Tropical Storm Warning. Tropical storm conditions are now expected by Saturday from Baltimore, Howard and Montgomery counties, south and east.Irene severity

The National Weather Service forecast office in Sterling, Va. says winds at BWI-Marshall Airport will pick up Saturday afternoon, with sustained winds increasing to 24 to 29 mph Saturday, gusting to 34. Saturday night, winds will increase to between 37 and 47 mph, gusting to 54 mph.

The Western Shore region should also be prepared for 6 to 8 inches of rain through Sunday, with more to the east. Up to a foot of rain is possible on the Lower Eastern Shore. A Flash Flood Watch was posted for the entire Western Shore. 

A storm surge of 4 to 8 feet was predicted for southern portions of the Chesapeake, its tributaries, the Eastern Shore and Delmarva. The beaches will see large and destructive waves.

"Now is the time to rush to completion preparations for the protection of life and property," forecasters warned. "Evacuate if directed to do so by local officials, or if your home  is vulnerable to high wind or flooding." Here's more:

"MINOR TO MODERATE DAMAGE IS LIKELY TO MANY MOBILE HOMES...
ESPECIALLY THOSE THAT HAVE CANOPIES...AWNINGS...OR CARPORTS.
POORLY CONSTRUCTED HOMES MAY SUSTAIN MINOR WALL DAMAGE AND PARTIAL
ROOF REMOVAL. OTHER HOMES MAY HAVE MINOR ROOF AND SIDING DAMAGE.
SOME LOOSE OUTDOOR ITEMS WILL BE TOSSED AROUND AND MAY CAUSE
ADDITIONAL DAMAGE. A FEW POWER LINES WILL BE KNOCKED DOWN
RESULTING IN SCATTERED POWER OUTAGES. SOME LARGE BRANCHES OF
HEALTHY TREES WILL BE SNAPPED. MOST NEWLY PLANTED TREES AND SHRUBS
WILL BE DAMAGED OR UPROOTED."

At the 5 a.m. report, Hurricane Irene was located about 400 miles south of Cape Hatteras, moving north at 14 mph. Top sustained winds had eased a bit to 110 mph. Some restrengthening was possible, and the storm was expected to pass near or over the Outer Banks Saturday, at Cat. 2 or 3.

Here is the forecast for Ocean City. Here is the latest advisory on Irene. Here is the forecast discussion.  

Posted by Frank Roylance at 6:52 AM | | Comments (8)
Categories: Forecasts, Hurricanes
        

Comments

How can I access online storm preparedness info on page 14 of today's Sun? I'd like to send to friends and family who may not see print version. Thank you

FR REPLIES: Here's think: http://bsun.md/nP6K9N Or, you can send them here: http://www.ready.gov/

Are they going to postpone the Yankees-Orioles games for the weekend?

FR REPLIES: In tropical storm conditions? You tell me. Officially, there's been no decision.

Could this storm flood fells point and the Harbor?

So there are 6-12 inches of rain coming down, and everyone is scrambling to buy water. Seems like an anomaly to me. Question: If I put out some clean, empty containers in the yard, and they fill with water, can I not drink that water? What if I run it through my household Brita water filter?

I'm located in Chesapeake Beach on the Western Shore high on a hill in a wooded area surrounded by many large should I be reasonably concerned enough to evacuate?
Ed

FR REPLIES: Many large ... trees? This storm will take down a lot of trees. If you stay home, you're best advised to stay in lower floors.

Do you have any idea what the perdicted storm surge will be for Bowleys Quarters/Essex tributaries area, I live right on the water?

FR REPLIES: Here's an interactive forecast map. You can check the probabilities for storm surges of various heights for any spot on the coast, including the Bay: http://1.usa.gov/pp4LJN Looks like a 5 to 10 percent chance for a surge of 2 feet or more. Southern bay much more at risk. Unless the storm changes course. Be prepared.

Is the Inner Harbor in danger of flooding?

FR REPLIES: Should be minor unless the storm changes course.

I live by west patapsaco baltimore, md 21230. what should i do to prepare for the storm and is it going to hit this area

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About Frank Roylance
This site is the Maryland Weather archive. The current Maryland Weather blog can be found here.
Frank Roylance is a reporter for The Baltimore Sun. He came to Baltimore from New Bedford, Mass. in 1980 to join the old Evening Sun. He moved to the morning Sun when the papers merged in 1992, and has spent most of his time since covering science, including astronomy and the weather. One of The Baltimore Sun's first online Web logs, the Weather Blog debuted in October 2004. In June 2006 Frank also began writing comments on local weather and stargazing for The Baltimore Sun's print Weather Page. Frank also answers readers’ weather queries for the newspaper and the blog. Frank Roylance retired in October 2011. Maryland Weather is now being updated by members of The Baltimore Sun staff
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