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May 29, 2011

Heat Advisory issued for Monday, Tuesday

Temperatures in Baltimore are headed for the mid-90s on Memorial Day and even higher on Tuesday. The National Weather Service has issued a Heat Advisory for the entire region, effective from noon Heat AdvisoryMonday through 8 p.m. Tuesday. 

The Heat Index, combining the effects of temperature and humidity, will be in the upper 90s Monday, and between 100 and 105 degrees on Tuesday. The Heat Index numbers do not just give us more reason to complain about the heat. High humidity makes it more difficult for the body to cool itself by evaporating sweat from the skin, increasing the risk of overheating and of heat-related illnesses - in effect, making it feel hotter than it is.  

The Baltimore City Department of Health on Sunday evening declared a Code Red Heat Alert for the city on Monday and Tuesday. The city will open cooling centers across the city and begin reaching out to vulnerable populations.

Here are more details on the Baltimore Code Red program. Here are the locations of cooling centers and other resources. In the meantime, please check on friends, family and neighbors who are without air conditioning.

And, just to make things interesting, there's also a Code Orange Air Quality Alert for the Baltimore metro region. From the Maryland Department of the Environment:

"A CODE ORANGE AIR QUALITY ALERT MEANS THAT AIR POLLUTION
CONCENTRATIONS
WITHIN THE REGION MAY BECOME UNHEALTHY FOR SENSITIVE
GROUPS. SENSITIVE GROUPS INCLUDE CHILDREN...PEOPLE SUFFERING FROM
ASTHMA...HEART DISEASE OR OTHER LUNG DISEASES...AND THE ELDERLY. THE
EFFECTS OF AIR POLLUTION CAN BE MINIMIZED BY AVOIDING STRENUOUS
ACTIVITY OR EXERCISE OUTDOORS."

Here's more on staying cool and being cool during a Heat Alert in Baltimore:

During periods of extreme heat, the Baltimore City Health Department recommends that city residents:
o Drink plenty of water or juice

o Avoid alcohol and caffeine

o Wipe skin with cool water as needed

o Reduce outside activities

o Wear light-weight and light-colored clothing
o Stay inside during the hottest time of day (11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.)

o Seek relief from the heat in air-conditioned locations

o Check on older, sick, or frail people in your community who may need help responding to the heat

o Never leave children or pets alone in closed vehicles, even for short periods of time

Watch out for signs of heat exhaustion and heat stroke:
o Confusion

o Nausea

o Light-headedness

o High body temperature with cool and clammy skin

o Hot, dry, flushed skin

o Rapid or slowed heart beat

o Seek medical help immediately if any of these symptoms occur

“Residents who are concerned about a neighbor can call 311. Call 911 if you are having a heat-related emergency,” said Baltimore City Fire Chief James Clack.
City residents who want information on the closest cooling center can call 311, the city serviceline. Any city resident experiencing the signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke should call 911. For more information, please visit our Website at www.baltimorehealth.org/coderedinfo.
Posted by Frank Roylance at 8:43 PM | | Comments (2)
Categories: Heat waves
        

Comments

I noticed the new listings of dew point on the printed weather pages. Thanks for the update, I'm impressed by how quickly you and the production people move.

Now if you can just talk to your friends in Bermuda and ask them to stop parking that weather system in the Atlantic that pumps all the humidity into our city, I'll be eternally grateful....

Non-air conditioned schools need to be closed tomorrow. With 30 kids in a room and no air, it isn't going to be healthy for anyone. If BCPS does decide to make those school stay open, then Superintendent Hairston should have to come work from my school. And not in the air conditioned office.

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About Frank Roylance
This site is the Maryland Weather archive. The current Maryland Weather blog can be found here.
Frank Roylance is a reporter for The Baltimore Sun. He came to Baltimore from New Bedford, Mass. in 1980 to join the old Evening Sun. He moved to the morning Sun when the papers merged in 1992, and has spent most of his time since covering science, including astronomy and the weather. One of The Baltimore Sun's first online Web logs, the Weather Blog debuted in October 2004. In June 2006 Frank also began writing comments on local weather and stargazing for The Baltimore Sun's print Weather Page. Frank also answers readers’ weather queries for the newspaper and the blog. Frank Roylance retired in October 2011. Maryland Weather is now being updated by members of The Baltimore Sun staff
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