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October 27, 2010

Tornado Watch posted for Bay region

UPDATE: 5 P.M.: The Tornado Watch has been lifted for Howard and Montgomery Counties, Baltimore and Washington. It remains in effect until 8 p.m. south and east of the I-95 corridor. Tornado Warnings have been issued for portions of Virginia.

UPDATE, 5:30 p.m.: A waterspout was reported this afternoon in the tidal Potomac, about 2 miles south southeast of Rock Point, in southern Charles County. (If you have pictures, please send them to me at frank.roylance@baltsun.com)

UPDATE, 6 p.m.: The Tornado Watch is now lifted for Baltimore, Harford and Cecil counties.

An earlier post resumes below: 

The National Weather Service has posted a Tornado Watch for the Baltimore-Washington corridor, Southern Maryland, the Entire Eastern Shore and eastern Virginia, effective until 8 p.m. Tornado watchWednesday.

MARYLAND COUNTIES INCLUDED ARE

ANNE ARUNDEL         BALTIMORE           CALVERT
CAROLINE             CECIL               CHARLES
DORCHESTER           HARFORD             HOWARD
KENT                 MONTGOMERY          PRINCE GEORGES
QUEEN ANNE`S         SOMERSET            ST. MARYS
TALBOT               WICOMICO            WORCESTER

A Tornado Watch means that conditions are in place for tornado development. A Tornado Warning would be issued if forecasters see rotation in their radar echoes, or spotters report a funnel cloud. Also implied in the watch is the possibility for severe thunderstorms, with large hail and damaging winds.

The risk of severe weather comes as a cold front moves across the region today, the remnant of the front that caused historic storms and several tornadoes across the Midwest on Tuesday. Here's more on today's storms.

Here's more from the NWS:

EFFECTIVE THIS WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON AND EVENING FROM 1215 PM UNTIL
   800 PM EDT.
  
   TORNADOES...HAIL TO 1 INCH IN DIAMETER...THUNDERSTORM WIND GUSTS
   TO 70 MPH...AND DANGEROUS LIGHTNING ARE POSSIBLE IN THESE AREAS.
  
   THE TORNADO WATCH AREA IS APPROXIMATELY ALONG AND 65 STATUTE
   MILES EAST AND WEST OF A LINE FROM 30 MILES WEST SOUTHWEST OF
   SOUTH HILL VIRGINIA TO 30 MILES NORTHWEST OF ATLANTIC CITY NEW
   JERSEY.  FOR A COMPLETE DEPICTION OF THE WATCH SEE THE ASSOCIATED
   WATCH OUTLINE UPDATE (WOUS64 KWNS WOU3).
  
   REMEMBER...A TORNADO WATCH MEANS CONDITIONS ARE FAVORABLE FOR
   TORNADOES AND SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS IN AND CLOSE TO THE WATCH
   AREA. PERSONS IN THESE AREAS SHOULD BE ON THE LOOKOUT FOR
   THREATENING WEATHER CONDITIONS AND LISTEN FOR LATER STATEMENTS
   AND POSSIBLE WARNINGS.
Posted by Frank Roylance at 12:17 PM | | Comments (4)
Categories: Tornadoes
        

Comments

Frank:

Is this Tornado watch for just the Bay region or for all of those counties you have listed: you seem to be saying one thing but implying another???

Thanks

FR: It's for all the Bay region, including the Eastern Shore. The counties listed are all those included in the watch that are within Maryland. (Howard and Montgomery are "inland" counties, but close enough for me.) Here's a map showing (in yellow) the entire area currently covered by tornado watches. http://www.nws.noaa.gov/

Frank: Here's the Storm Prediction Center link with the maps and complete watch posting:

http://www.spc.noaa.gov/products/watch/ww0733.html

The tornado watch seems to have been lifted early.

FR: Only in Howard, Montgomery, Baltimore and Washington. It's still in effect south and east of the I-95 corridor. Tornado warnings have been issued for parts of Virginia. http://forecast.weather.gov/wwamap/wwatxtget.php?cwa=lwx&wwa=tornado%20warning

This just in from Jeff Halverson at UMBC:

"I saw a low pressure of 956 mb for this storm at one point in the past 24 hours...remarkable for an inland depression. This is equivalent to a Cat 3 hurricane! Of course, we didn't observe winds of this category (the max gust I noted was 81 mph) but certainly widespread tropical storm force winds - causing blowing snow, hence the blizzard warnings.

"According to Accuweather stats, the central pressure of this low is #2 ranked in the all time list of Great Lakes storms (behind #1 Great Ohio Blizzard of 1978).

"When these storms really get cranked up over the Lakes, they are sometimes called "Witches of November". A "witch" sank the Edmund Fitzgerald in Nov of 1975. The current storm was certainly an early-season "witch" and its rapid intensification had everything to do with an extra-potent jet stream disturbance crossing the Pacific Northwest.

"The tornado watches all along the eastern seaboard and Mid Atlantic were associated with the front wrapping around this monster low - so much spin in the atmosphere!

-- Jeffrey B. Halverson,
Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology (JCET)
University of Maryland Baltimore County"

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About Frank Roylance
This site is the Maryland Weather archive. The current Maryland Weather blog can be found here.
Frank Roylance is a reporter for The Baltimore Sun. He came to Baltimore from New Bedford, Mass. in 1980 to join the old Evening Sun. He moved to the morning Sun when the papers merged in 1992, and has spent most of his time since covering science, including astronomy and the weather. One of The Baltimore Sun's first online Web logs, the Weather Blog debuted in October 2004. In June 2006 Frank also began writing comments on local weather and stargazing for The Baltimore Sun's print Weather Page. Frank also answers readers’ weather queries for the newspaper and the blog. Frank Roylance retired in October 2011. Maryland Weather is now being updated by members of The Baltimore Sun staff
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