baltimoresun.com

« September ends warm and very wet | Main | Comet Hartley 2 makes an appearance in October »

October 2, 2010

NWS report on Thursday's tornado in Arundel

Here's the full statement from the National Weather Service on Thursday morning's EF-0 tornado in northern Anne Arundel County:

"...TORNADO CONFIRMED EAST OF PASADENA MARYLAND...

LOCATION...2 MILES EAST OF LAKE SHORE IN ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY MARYLAND
DATE...SEPTEMBER 30 2010
ESTIMATED TIME...9:46 AM TO 9:49 AM
MAXIMUM EF-SCALE RATING...EF-0
ESTIMATED MAXIMUM WIND SPEED...80 MPH
MAXIMUM PATH WIDTH...200 YARDS
PATH LENGTH...1 MILE
BEGINNING LAT/LON...39.1007N/76.4474W
ENDING LAT/LON...39.1134N/76.4492W
* FATALITIES...NONE
* INJURIES...NONE"

 

* THE INFORMATION IN THIS STATEMENT IS PRELIMINARY AND SUBJECT TO
  CHANGE PENDING FINAL REVIEW OF THE EVENT(S) AND PUBLICATION IN
  NWS STORM DATA.

...SUMMARY...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CONDUCTED A STORM SURVEY OF DAMAGE
THAT OCCURRED TO NORTHEAST ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY JUST NORTH OF
GIBSON ISLAND AND EAST OF LAKE SHORE IN THE COMMUNITY OF MILBURN.

AFTER INSPECTING THE DAMAGE ON THE GROUND...SPEAKING WITH SEVERAL
MILBURN RESIDENTS...SIFTING THROUGH NWS AND FAA RADAR DATA...AND
LOOKING THROUGH LOCAL WEATHER OBSERVATIONS...IT WAS DETERMINED
THAT A EF-0 TORNADO WITH MAXIMUM ESTIMATED WINDS OF 80 MPH MOVED
THROUGH THE AREA...AND PASSED WITHIN A HALF MILE OF A SCHOOL
COMPLEX THAT INCLUDES CHESAPEAKE HIGH... CHESAPEAKE BAY MIDDLE...
AND BODKIN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS.

AT 9:46 AM ON THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 30TH AN EF-0 TORNADO FORMED OVER
CORNFIELD CREEK AND KNOCKED A SAILBOAT ON ITS SIDE. THE TORNADO
MOVED ACROSS THE CREEK AND INTO THE COMMUNITY OF MILBURN ON THE
SOUTHEAST SIDE OF MILBURN CIRCLE. SEVERAL TREES AND LARGE
BRANCHES WERE SNAPPED DOWN AND UPROOTED...MAINLY FROM SOUTHEAST TO
NORTHWEST. THERE WERE A FEW SMALLER BRANCHES THAT INDICATED A MUCH
WEAKER WIND IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION. A BOAT HOUSE SUSTAINED SOME
SHINGLE DAMAGE ON ITS LEADING EDGE. A PIECE OF POOL FURNITURE
IMPACTED A DECORATIVE STONE WALL AND TOPPLED IT.

THE TORNADO MAXIMIZED ITS STRENGTH WITH WINDS ESTIMATED TO BE 80
MPH AS IT WENT ACROSS THE CIRCLE AND OVER HOUSES 49 THROUGH 55 ON
MILBURN CIRCLE. IN THAT AREA ABOUT TEN LARGE TREES WERE UPROOTED
OR SNAPPED OFF...SEVERAL OF THEM MAPLE TREES. A TREE FELL ON A
TRUCK. ANOTHER TREE CRUSHED A WORK SHED AND FELL INTO A POOL. A
FEW HOMES SUSTAINED MINOR SIDING AND SHINGLE DAMAGE. POWER WAS
KNOCKED OUT TO THE COMMUNITY. NEARLY ALL OF THE DAMAGE IN THIS
AREA WAS FROM SOUTHEAST TO NORTHWEST.

THE TORNADO LIFTED AND WEAKENED AS IT WENT INTO THE WOODS ON THE
NORTH SIDE OF THE COMMUNITY BEHIND THE MILBURN CIRCLE AREA.
HOWEVER IT CONTINUED TO TOUCHDOWN OCCASIONALLY AS IT PROCEEDED
ALMOST DUE NORTH. AFTER CROSSING A LARGE FIELD BEHIND THE
FOREST...THE TORNADO SNAPPED DOWN 4 TREES ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF
MOUNTAIN ROAD AND SNAPPED A LARGE BRANCH OFF A TREE ON THE NORTH
SIDE. THE TORNADO LIFTED FOR THE FINAL TIME AFTER SNAPPING SEVERAL
LARGE BRANCHES OFF A TREE AT 8321 DOCK ROAD AT 9:49 AM.

MOST RESIDENTS SPOKEN WITH NOTED THEY HAD HEARD ABOUT THE TORNADO
WARNING THROUGH LOCAL MEDIA OR THROUGH NEIGHBORS AND FRIENDS WHO
RELAYED THE WARNING. RESIDENT REPORTS INDICATED THE WINDS CAME UP
QUICKLY DURING A LESSENING OF THE RAINFALL. FIRST FROM SOUTHEAST
TO NORTHWEST... THEN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION. ANOTHER SAW WHAT
LOOKED LIKE A WATERSPOUT COMING OFF THE CREEK INTO THE COMMUNITY.
THE COMMUNITY WAS FORTUNATE IN THAT OTHER THAN THE TRUCK AND THE
SHED...ALL OF THE LARGE TREES FELL TO THE GROUND AND NOT ON THE
HOMES THEY SURROUNDED.

Posted by Frank Roylance at 3:17 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Tornadoes
        

Post a comment

All comments must be approved by the blog author. Please do not resubmit comments if they do not immediately appear. You are not required to use your full name when posting, but you should use a real e-mail address. Comments may be republished in print, but we will not publish your e-mail address. Our full Terms of Service are available here.

Verification (needed to reduce spam):

About Frank Roylance
This site is the Maryland Weather archive. The current Maryland Weather blog can be found here.
Frank Roylance is a reporter for The Baltimore Sun. He came to Baltimore from New Bedford, Mass. in 1980 to join the old Evening Sun. He moved to the morning Sun when the papers merged in 1992, and has spent most of his time since covering science, including astronomy and the weather. One of The Baltimore Sun's first online Web logs, the Weather Blog debuted in October 2004. In June 2006 Frank also began writing comments on local weather and stargazing for The Baltimore Sun's print Weather Page. Frank also answers readers’ weather queries for the newspaper and the blog. Frank Roylance retired in October 2011. Maryland Weather is now being updated by members of The Baltimore Sun staff
-- ADVERTISEMENT --

Sign up for FREE weather alerts*
Get free Baltimore Sun mobile alerts
Sign up for weather text alerts
SKY NOTES WEATHER

Returning user? Update preferences.
Sign up for more Sun text alerts
*Standard message and data rates apply. Click here for Frequently Asked Questions.
Maryland Weather Center


Area Weather Stations
Resources and Sun coverage
• Weather news

• Readers' photos

• Data from the The Sun's weather station

• 2011 stargazers' calendar

• Become a backyard astronomer in five simple steps

• Baltimore Weather Archive
Daily airport weather data for Baltimore from 1948 to today

• National Weather Service:
Sterling Forecast Office

• Capital Weather Gang:
Washington Post weather blog

• CoCoRaHS:
Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network. Local observations by volunteers

• Weather Bug:
Webcams across the state

• National Data Buoy Center:
Weather and ocean data from bay and ocean buoys

• U.S. Drought Monitor:
Weekly maps of drought conditions in the U.S.

• USGS Earthquake Hazards Program:
Real-time data on earthquakes

• Water data:
From the USGS, Maryland

• National Hurricane Center

• Air Now:
Government site for air quality information

• NWS Climate Prediction Center:
Long-term and seasonal forecasts

• U.S. Climate at a Glance:
NOAA interactive site for past climate data, national, state and city

• Clear Sky Clock:
Clear sky alerts for stargazers

• NASA TV:
Watch NASA TV

• Hubblesite:
Home page for Hubble Space Telescope

• Heavens Above:
Everything for the backyard stargazer, tailored to your location

• NASA Eclipse Home Page:
Centuries of eclipse predictions

• Cruise Critic: Hurricane Zone:
Check to see how hurricanes may affect your cruise schedule

• Warming World:
NASA explains the science of climate change with articles, videos, “data visualizations,” and space-based imagery.

• What on Earth:
NASA blog on current research at the space agency.
Most Recent Comments
Blog updates
Recent updates to baltimoresun.com news blogs
 Subscribe to this feed
Charm City Current
Stay connected