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June 30, 2005

Berlin weather

In honor or our traveling Weather Blog editor:
Berlin Weather
This British site gives forecast for region, in English, plus you can send a video weather postcard.
http://www.weatheronline.co.uk/cgi-bin/regframe?PRG=citybild&WMO=10384&LANG=en

Sprechen zie Deutsch ?
Institute für Meteorologie
http://www.met.fu-berlin.de/

World Weather source
"OFFICIAL weather observations, weather forecasts and
climatological information for selected cities supplied by
National Meteorological & Hydrological Services (NMHSs) worldwide.
The NMHSs make official weather observations in their respective
countries. Links to their official weather service web sites and
tourism board/organization are also provided whenever available.
Weather icons are shown alongside worded forecasts in this version
to facilitate visual inspection." Covers hundreds of cities around
the world. Also available in Arabic, Chinese, and Portuguese.

http://www.worldweather.org/

Posted by Admin at 8:38 PM | | Comments (1)
Categories: Travel
        

Local weather and local travel warnings

SHORT TERM FORECAST
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CHARLESTON WV
335 PM EDT THU JUN 30 2005WIDELY SCATTERED SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS WILL DRIFT SOUTHEAST OVER
THE AREA THROUGH 530 PM. RAINFALL AMOUNTS WILL AVERAGE A TENTH OF AN
INCH WITH A FEW LOCATIONS SEEING UP TO A HALF AN INCH.
____________________________________
HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC
1124 AM EDT THU JUN 30 2005
THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR MARYLAND WEST OF THE
EASTERN SHORE INCLUDING THE CHESAPEAKE BAY AND EAST OF GARRETT
COUNTY...EASTERN WEST VIRGINIA...NORTHERN AND CENTRAL VIRGINIA...
WASHINGTON DC AND THE TIDAL POTOMAC RIVER.

.DAY ONE...TODAY AND TONIGHT

ISOLATED SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS WILL BE POSSIBLE THIS AFTERNOON AND
EVENING. ANY SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS THAT DEVELOP WILL BE CAPABLE OF
PRODUCING WIND GUSTS TO 60 MPH AND TORRENTIAL RAINFALL. DUE TO
THE SLOW MOVEMENT OF THE THUNDERSTORMS...FLASH FLOODING WILL ALSO
BE POSSIBLE.

.DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN...FRIDAY THROUGH WEDNESDAY

A COLD FRONT IS EXPECTED TO MOVE EAST ACROSS THE MID ATLANTIC
REGION ON FRIDAY. SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS MAY BE POSSIBLE ALONG AND
AHEAD OF THE FRONTAL BOUNDARY. ANY SEVERE STORMS THAT DEVELOP
WILL BE CAPABLE OF PRODUCING WIND GUSTS TO 60 MPH...LARGE HAIL AND
TORRENTIAL RAINFALL.


.SPOTTER INFORMATION STATEMENT...

SPOTTER ACTIVATION MAY BE REQUIRED THIS AFTERNOON.
__________________________

SPECIAL WEATHER STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MOUNT HOLLY NJ
710 AM EDT THU JUN 30 2005

710 AM EDT THU JUN 30 2005

...LOCALLY HEAVY RAIN MAY OCCUR TODAY AND AGAIN FRIDAY...

A VERY HUMID AIR MASS WILL REMAIN IN PLACE OVER EASTERN
PENNSYLVANIA, NEW JERSEY, AND DELAWARE TODAY AND FRIDAY. SCATTERED
SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS ARE EXPECTED, AND WILL BE ACCOMPANIED BY
LOCALLY HEAVY RAIN. AS A RESULT, THERE MAY BE FLOODING IN AREAS OF
POOR DRAINAGE AND ALONG SMALL STREAMS AND CREEKS. IF YOU LIVE IN A
LOCATION THAT IS PRONE TO FLASH FLOODING BE PREPARED TO MOVE TO
HIGHER GROUND IF YOU EXPERIENCE A SHOWER OR THUNDERSTORM THAT IS
ACCOMPANIED BY VERY HEAVY RAINFALL.

USE EXTRA CARE IF YOU WILL BE OUT ON THE ROAD DURING THE NEXT COUPLE
OF DAYS. THE HEAVY RAIN WILL REDUCE YOUR VISIBILITY. ALSO, BE SURE
NOT TO DRIVE THROUGH FLOOD WATERS, AS THE WATER MAY BE DEEPER THAN
YOU THINK.

IN ADDITION TO THE POTENTIAL FOR HEAVY RAIN, ANY OF THE SCATTERED
THUNDERSTORMS TODAY MAY BE ACCOMPANIED BY FREQUENT CLOUD TO GROUND
LIGHTNING, WIND GUSTS UP TO AROUND 40 MPH AND SMALL HAIL. IF YOU
OBSERVE THREATENING WEATHER, SEEK SHELTER AT ONCE.

A COLD FRONT FROM THE NORTHWEST IS EXPECTED TO ARRIVE FRIDAY NIGHT.
THE THUNDERSTORMS THAT PRECEDE THE COLD FRONT FRIDAY AFTERNOON AND
EVENING COULD BECOME STRONG WITH THE POSSIBILITY OF DAMAGING WIND
GUSTS AND LARGE HAIL. ONCE THE COLD FRONT PUSHES THROUGH FRIDAY
NIGHT, LESS HUMID AIR IS FORECAST TO BUILD DOWN FROM THE NORTHWEST
AND BRING A DRY HOLIDAY WEEKEND.

Posted by Admin at 5:00 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Travel
        

June 29, 2005

More t-storms

AT 649 PM EDT...DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED STRONG THUNDERSTORMS ALONG A
LINE EXTENDING ACROSS NORTHERN AND WESTERN MONTGOMERY NORTHEASTWARD
INTO CENTRAL HOWARD COUNTY AND INTO WESTERN BALTIMORE COUNTY JUST
WEST OF BALTIMORE CITY. THIS LINE OF STORM IS MOVING SOUTHEAST AT 15
TO 20 MPH. THESE STORMS WILL BE CAPABLE OF PRODUCING WIND GUSTS TO
45 MPH. THROUGH 745 PM...THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA...SOUTHEASTERN
HOWARD...SOUTHEASTERN MONTGOMERY...ANNE ARUNDEL...NORTHERN PRINCE
GEORGES...BALTIMORE CITY AND SOUTH CENTRAL BALTIMORE COUNTIES WILL
BE AFFECTED BY THESE STORMS.

RESIDENTS SHOULD BE ALERT AND BE PREPARED TO SEEK SAFE SHELTER IF
THREATENING WEATHER APPROACHES OR A WARNING IS ISSUED.
- from: SHORT TERM FORECAST
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC
652 PM EDT WED JUN 29 2005

Posted by Admin at 8:19 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Watches and warnings
        

June 28, 2005

Hazardous Weather

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC
831 PM EDT TUE JUN 28 2005
..TIME... ...EVENT... ...CITY LOCATION... ...LAT.LON...
..DATE... ....MAG.... ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
..REMARKS..
0700 PM FLASH FLOOD WOODLAWN 39.31N 76.75W
06/28/2005 BALTIMORE MD FIRE DEPT/RESCUE
WATER FLOODED UP TO THE HOOD OF A VEHICLE.

___________
Isolated thunderstorms in the Baltimore area has created excessive runoff causing the National Weather Service in Sterling, Va. to issue a flash flood warning through 5:30 p.m. Excessive runoff will cause flash flooding of small creeks, and streams, highways, and underpasses throughout the Baltimore area. At 3:37 p.m. one inch of rain had fallen and another inch could fall by nightfall.
A HEAT ADVISORY IS IN EFFECT FOR THIS AFTERNOON THROUGH 6 PM. HEAT
INDEX VALUES OF 98 TO 103 ARE CURRENTLY FORECAST.

Posted by Admin at 4:57 PM | | Comments (2)
Categories: Watches and warnings
        

June 27, 2005

Gloomy Tuesday

Sticky, humid, overcast skies to move out by Monday evening. Tuesday's forcast is for partly cloudy skies in the morning, changing to mostly cloudy by early afternoon. High temperatures will be in the mid 80's with south winds at 5 mph. Chance of rain is 40%. Tuesday night will be mostly cloudy with a chance of showers and thunderstorms, low's in the upper 60's and a 30% chance of rain. From the National Weather Service for the Baltimore area.

Posted by Admin at 2:50 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Climate change
        

June 23, 2005

Hot here, Weather in Sweden

SPECIAL WEATHER STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MOUNT HOLLY NJ
400 AM EDT FRI JUN 24 2005

...HOT AND HUMID CONDITIONS ARE EXPECTED DURING THE WEEKEND OVER
EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA, NEW JERSEY, DELAWARE, AND NORTHEASTERN
MARYLAND...

A SOUTHWEST FLOW OF AIR AT THE SURFACE, AND STRENGTHENING HIGH
PRESSURE IN THE UPPER ATMOSPHERE, WILL COMBINE TO CAUSE A RETURN OF
HEAT AND HUMIDITY FOR THE NEXT SEVERAL DAYS. TEMPERATURES WILL RISE
WELL INTO THE 80S TODAY, BUT EVEN HOTTER CONDITIONS ARE FORECAST FOR
SATURDAY, WITH HIGH TEMPERATURES IN THE LOWER AND MID 90S EXPECTED
AWAY FROM THE OCEAN AND BAYS. TEMPERATURES COULD BE A COUPLE OF
DEGREES LOWER SUNDAY, BUT IT WILL REMAIN HOT AND HUMID. THE HEAT
INDEX MAY RISE TO NEAR 100 FOR AN HOUR OR TWO SATURDAY AFTERNOON,
ESPECIALLY AT URBAN LOCATIONS, AND PARTICULARLY IN AND NEAR
PHILADELPHIA. TEMPERATURES WILL BE COOLER NEAR THE WATER, AND OVER
HIGHER ELEVATIONS OF THE POCONOS AND FAR NORTHWESTERN NEW JERSEY.

LIMIT OUTDOOR ACTIVITY IF POSSIBLE, ESPECIALLY DURING THE HOTTEST
PART OF THE DAY, FROM NOON TO AROUND 7:00 PM.

WHEN GOING OUTDOORS IN THE HEAT AND SUN, WEAR LIGHT COLORED AND
LOOSE CLOTHING, AS WELL AS A HAT AND SUNBLOCK. BE SURE TO CHECK ON
ELDERLY RELATIVES AND NEIGHBORS, AS THE ELDERLY AND INFIRM ARE MOST
SUSCEPTIBLE TO HEAT RELATED HEALTH PROBLEMS. ALSO, ENSURE THAT
OUTDOOR PETS HAVE SHADE AND PLENTY OF WATER. NEVER LEAVE CHILDREN OR
PETS IN A CLOSED VEHICLE.

TEMPERATURES ARE EXPECTED TO REMAIN WELL ABOVE NORMAL AT LEAST FOR
EARLY NEXT WEEK, ALTHOUGH THEY MAY BE A COUPLE OF DEGREES LESS HOT
THAN OVER THE WEEKEND.

STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO ALL HAZARDS FOR THE LATEST WEATHER
INFORMATION.
_________________
If you are traveling (as the Weather Blog editor is) check local weather stations, such as the one at sweden.se which also has a satellite map for all of Scandinavia.
(To convert Celsius to Fahrenheit temperatures use this converter.)
_________________
Don't miss today's story in the Sun: Blowing in the Wind
Every year, the United States and the Caribbean get a dusting from Asian and African deserts. The results are not pretty and may be getting worse.

Posted by Admin at 5:35 PM | | Comments (1)
Categories: Travel
        

Geography, weather quiz from NASA

How's your geography IQ? Click here and try your hand at figuring out the location pictured in a satellite image, and answering the accompanying questions. Good luck.

Posted by Admin at 12:00 PM | | Comments (1)
Categories: Cool pictures
        

No news today

What can I say? It's perfect. There's a big 'ole high-pressure center planted off the beach at Ocean City. The radar is blank as I write this (except for that pesky "ground clutter"). The satellite images are blank. There are no watches or warnings on the forecast map. The temperature is headed into the comfy low 80s, with low humidity and sunshine. (It gets hot tomorrow and moreso over the weekend. But hey... we live for today, right?)

So what's not to like? Unless of course you're sitting in an office with nothing but a sliver of light from a distant window that overlooks something like the State Prison. Or, in my case, exactly the State Prison. Sigh.

Posted by Admin at 11:40 AM | | Comments (1)
Categories: Forecasts
        

June 22, 2005

Downpours this afternoon

The National Weather Service is tracking some strong showers headed south from Pennsylvania toward the Baltimore region, packing with brief downpours, some lightning and gusts to 30 mph. Here's the radar, and here's the advisory.

Posted by Admin at 5:30 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Forecasts
        

Monday's low tied a BWI record

Missed this one when it flew by: Monday's low temperature of 52 degrees tied a record low for the date, set in 1956. The day's high was just 72 degrees, making the average for the date just 62 degrees. That was 11 degrees below the 30-year norm. (The same date was cold last year, too - with a low of just 56 degrees.)

Salisbury, too, hit a record low. It was 42 degrees Monday morning in the Eastern Shore town. That broke the 45-degree record set just last year.

But things will be warming up soon enough. They're looking for highs near 90 by Wednesday of next week.

Posted by Admin at 4:56 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: By the numbers
        

Monsoon arrives late in Bangladesh

It's finally raining in Bangladesh. But the annual monsoons arrived later than anytime in at least the last 33 years, officials say. They have so far brought unusually little rain, and they've followed the shortest winter in a decade in the region. Meteorologists in the country are blaming global warming. What do you think?

Posted by Admin at 4:34 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Events
        

"New Madrid" fault shakes Kentucky

California isn't the only place experiencing a recent flurry of earthquakes. Western Kentucky has been shaken by at least five small tremors since February. Two struck yesterday.

The first, rated 3.9 on the Richter scale, struck 10 miles from Cairo, Ill., at about 7:21 a.m. It was also felt in parts of Kentucky, Arkansas, Missouri and Tennessee. Geologists said it originated 21 kilometers beneath the surface of the Earth.

The second, rated 2.7, struck at 9 p.m. last night in nearly the same location. This one occurred 15.6 kilometers down.

The Memphis Commercial Appeal reported today that the morning quake was the fourth since February with a magnitude close to 4.0. On average, the region feels a quake of that magnitude once every 5 to 8 years, according to experts cited by the paper.

The region is part of the New Madrid fault zone, which extends from Cairo, Ill. into Arkansas, and includes the town of New Madrid, Mo. The fault was the source of a series of powerful quakes, with magnitudes estimated as high as 8.0, that struck in 1811 and 1812.

Those quakes shook the ground, created new lakes and briefly reversed the course of the Mississippi River. They were felt as far away as Boston, where the shaking rattled steeples and rang church bells.

The increase in quake frequency in the region has prompted a series of public meeting called to calm residents, according to the Commercial Appeal. One of the meetings, in Dyersburg, Tenn., was held Monday evening, two hours before the 9 p.m. tremor.

Posted by Admin at 3:41 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Events
        

June 21, 2005

A gathering of planets

As skies clear out over the next few days, Marylanders will get an excellent chance to watch an intricate dance of planets in the western sky after sunset.

The "star" of the show is brilliant Venus, the second planet from the sun. Look for it low in the western sky about 45 minutes after sunset. (Sunset in Baltimore this week occurs at about 8:37 p.m., so you can start looking at about 9:15 p.m.)

Venus will be the brightest star-like object in that part of the sky.

But as the skies darken, you should be able to pick out Saturn - the sixth planet from the sun. Although it is far in the background, it appears just to the upper left of Venus. The elusive planet Mercury - closest to the sun, smallest and dimmest of the trio - is just to the lower right of Venus. Binoculars, a reasonably dark location and clear skies will help you find these planets.

As the days go by this week, Saturn will appear to slide steadily past Venus and Mercury, until they are bunched together in a tight wad just 2.5 degrees across on Friday and Saturday, the 24th and 25th. On those evenings, you'll be able to hold your pinky at arms length and hide all three planets behind your fingertip. Some say it's the best, tightest and easiest-to-see planetary conjunction until 2030.

Jupiter, meanwhile, is the bright "star" seen high above the southwestern horizon by the time skies grow dark this week. So, if you manage to spot them all, you'll be seeing four of the six naked-eye planets in the solar system. And, of course, you're standing on a fifth. The missing planet, Mars, is actually very visible, too, growing brighter each night as Earth moves toward its closest approach in late October. But it doesn't rise in the east until about 1:30 a.m. If you're staying up, it's well worth a look.

Posted by Admin at 11:29 AM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Sky Watching
        

June 20, 2005

Clouds moving out

The cool, cloudy weather that moved in Sunday and chilled many Father's Day celebrations, will be moving out soon, according to the weather service. The problem has been a "cutoff" low pressure center that's been spinning idly to our south, pumping cool air, clouds and moisture in from the Atlantic Ocean.

But it's all supposed to clear out gradually beginning tomorrow. After a slight risk of showers Tuesday and early Wednesday, it will all be replaced by a high-pressure system that will spin the other way and reverse the flow. We'll see temperatures rising into the 80s, clear, dry skies and great stargazing Thursday and Friday. Downright hot weather is due back on Saturday.

The average high temperatures for this part of June are in the mid-80s, with average lows in the low 60s. After a cool May at BWI, we had 11 straight days over 85 degrees - June 5 to 15. But it's been cool ever since.

Posted by Admin at 5:51 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Forecasts
        

Summer Solstice arrives at 2:48 a.m.

The Northern Hemisphere's official summer season will commence as we sleep tonight. The northern summer solstice occurs at 2:48 a.m. Tuesday morning, just as winter begins for people living south of the equator.

The solstice marks the moment when the sun reaches its highest point above (north of) the celestial equator. (Imagine a flat plane extending out into space from the Earth's equator.) It also marks the longest period of daylight hours in the northern hemisphere. In Baltimore, the sun will rise at 5:40 a.m. and set at 8:37 p.m., for a total of 15 hours and 57 minutes of sunshine.

From here on, the days will grow gradually shorter, until the winter solstice arrives at 1:36 p.m. on Dec. 21.

Here's how Matt Quandt, of Astronomy magazine, describes the event:

"The summer solstice is the longest day of the year — the most hours of daylight — for people living north of the equator. This astronomical event occurs ... when the Sun reaches its highest point above the celestial equator, a projection of Earth’s equator into space. Since the winter solstice 6 months ago, when the Sun was at its lowest point in the sky, our star has been climbing steadily each day, increasing the amount of daylight.

"For several days preceding and following the solstice, however, the Sun appears to stand still, its maximum altitude unchanging. This phenomenon is captured by the word “solstice.” In Latin, sol means “Sun,” and stitium is a suffix that means “stop.”

"Although the solstice is the longest day of the year, it isn’t necessarily the hottest. A lag in solar heating means temperatures will continue to rise for about a month afterward. So, while the dog days of summer will be here soon, June 21 actually marks the start of the Sun’s descent in the sky, leading to autumn and winter’s increasingly shorter days and longer nights.

"These seasonal changes occur because Earth’s axis, the imaginary line connecting the North and South poles, tilts 23.5° with respect to the planet’s orbital plane. When the Northern Hemisphere is tipped toward the Sun, it receives radiation more directly than it does during winter, when the Sun is low on the horizon.

"So, while the “summer” solstice brings many people north of the equator happiness, people in the Southern Hemisphere are in the midst of winter."

Posted by Admin at 12:36 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Almanac
        

Lightning safety reminder from NWS

The National Weather Service is reminding us this week about the dangers of lightning. We often measure our risks by comparing them with the risk of being struck by lightning, because we perceive that risk as being extremely low. Still, every year Americans are killed by lightning bolts, and it's often because they didn't take the danger seriously, or because they inadvertently multiplied their risks because they didn't know enough about lightning safety.

Here's a memo from the weather service that's well worth reading as the summer thunderstorm season cranks up. Be safe. Don't take chances with lightning. For more, visit the NWS's lightning safety page.

Posted by Admin at 12:12 PM | | Comments (0) | TrackBacks (1)
Categories: Notes to readers
        

June 15, 2005

Rain risk evaporates

Looks like the showers or thunderstorms accompanying the cool front headed our way will miss us. The National Weather Service has cleared all the rain risk from our forecast chart through the weekend. Sunshine and mild daytime temperatures, plus cool nights for sleeping are all that lies ahead until temps return to the 80s next Tuesday and Wednesday. It doesn't get much better than this.

Posted by Admin at 7:50 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Forecasts
        

Baltimore: America's 55th-sweatiest city

Mobtown has been ranked again on another list of dubious value. In a bare-faced bid to win publicity, Old Spice - makers of everyone's Dad's after-shave (and antiperspirants) - has published its 4th Annual Top 100 Sweatiest Cities list.

Phoeniz, Ariz. won the dampest spot. San Francisco, which inspired Mark Twain (I think) to state that the coldest winter he ever endured was summer in San Fran, was ranked No. 100.

Old Spice claims it assembled the list by concocting a formula that considers average heights and weights for men and women in the city, as well as average temperatures in Summer 2004. Somehow, they also figure in the amount of sweat one would produce after walking for an hour. The person responsible for this bit of junk science appears to be Paul Ruscher, a Florida State associate professor of meteorology who should know better.

Anyway, Baltimore was ranked as just a tad sweatier than Evansville, Ind., but drier than Omaha, Neb. We probably would have done worse had last summer not been relatively mild.

Here's the Old Spice release:

CINCINNATI, June 15, 2005 – In anticipation of the first day of summer on Tuesday, June 21, Old Spice today announced its Fourth Annual Top-100 Sweatiest Cities List – a ranking of the nation’s heaviest sweaters during the summer months. For the second time in four years, the No. 1 perspiration producer is Phoenix, taking the title from last year’s top-ranking city of
El Paso, Texas. The top honor also went to the famed desert city back in 2003.
Phoenix turned up the heat to jump to the top of the list after dropping to just No. 3 last year, living up to its nickname “Valley of the Sun.” Living in what now ranks as one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation, the average Phoenix resident produced .76 liters of sweat per hour during a typical summer day in 2004 (more than two 12-ounce glasses of lemonade). In a two-hour period, residents of Phoenix collectively produced more than enough sweat to equal a 12-ounce glass of lemonade for everyone in the state of Arizona!
In recognition of its top placement on the list, Old Spice will be delivering a year’s supply of Old Spice Red Zone antiperspirant, the strongest form of wetness protection available for guys, to Phoenix mayor, Honorable Phil Gordon.
“Weather patterns are constantly changing, and this of course has a tremendous effect on where cities fall in the Sweatiest Cities ranking,” said Dr. Paul Ruscher, associate professor and associate chair of meteorology at Florida State University. “While cities like Phoenix have consistently remained one of the top-10 sweatiest cities, cities like San Francisco, which ranked No. 68 last year, fell to the bottom of our list at No. 100 – claiming the title ‘Least Sweaty City.’”
Cities in Texas and Florida continued to dominate the top-10 while, for the first time, a city in Nevada cracked the top-5 with Las Vegas ranking No. 2. The least sweatiest cities include Green Bay, Wis., Colorado Springs, Colo. and San Francisco.

Posted by Admin at 4:23 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Events
        

Break time

After 10 straight days with highs above 85 degrees (today should be the 11th, with a forecast high of 92), we're headed for some much nicer weather as we get over the week's hump. The break comes tomorrow, after some overnight rains and the arrival of a front from Canada. The high Thursday should be around 80, with more rain Friday, followed by a beautiful weekend with afternoon highs around 75 degrees.

Normal - that is, average - afternoon temperatures at this time of year are about 83 degrees, with overnight lows in the low 60s.

Hard to believe it's only been since June 4 that we moved into above-average daily temperatures, after 19 straight days in May and early June with below-average temps. It was 12 days ago that the afternoon high at BWI was 64 degrees. On June 1, the mercury dipped to 51 degrees overnight.

Posted by Admin at 10:19 AM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Forecasts
        

June 14, 2005

Nice sunset ... on Mars

Here's a sight lots of us never expected to see, except in science fiction movies: sunset on Mars, courtesy of NASA's rover Spirit. The sun looks roughly two-thirds the size it does from Earth because Mars was about 40 percent farther from the sun when the picture was taken than we were. Cool.

Posted by Admin at 7:47 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Cool pictures
        

Heat advisory expires; heat doesn't

The National Weather Service has allowed its heat advisory to expire at 6 p.m. But the temperature at BWI remained at 90 degrees, and the misery index remained high. Here's how Sterling put it:

"THE HEAT ADVISORY HAS BEEN ALLOWED TO EXPIRE AT 6 PM. ALTHOUGH HEAT
INDEX VALUES WERE CLOSE TO 100 DEGREES EARLY THIS EVENING...THESE
VALUES ARE EXPECTED TO FALL BELOW THRESHOLD VALUES AS TEMPERATURES
CONTINUE TO COOL. HOWEVER...HEAT INDICES WILL REMAIN ABOVE 90 THROUGH
THE EVENING. PEOPLE ARE URGED TO DRINK PLENTY OF FLUIDS IF
SPENDING TIME OUTDOORS."

We may get some rain overnight, but the heat will be back tomorrow. Real relief starts Thursday.

And while we simmered today, NASA's Earth-observing AQUA satellite was snapping our picture. Here's how the Eastern U.S. looked from space today. (Click on the upper left-hand image to enlarge it.) Notice the haze we were under, and the thunderstorms brewing to our west.

Posted by Admin at 7:42 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Watches and warnings
        

We'll all sleep later from here on

You say you have a hard time sleeping in the morning with the sun rising so early? Are the birds waking up so early their blasted singing is waking you up, too? Is that what's troubling you, Bunky?

Well, if so, here's good news. This morning marked the earliest sunrise of the year - 5:39 a.m. EDT. From here on out the sunrises get later and later until Jan. 5, 2006, when Old Sol will rise over Baltimore at a much more civilized 7:27 a.m.

The longest day, by the way, will be June 21 - at the Summer Solstice - and the latest sunset will occur here on June 27, at 8:37 p.m.

Posted by Admin at 4:18 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Sky Watching
        

BWI on the "cool" side this afternoon

Well, it's plenty hot out there, all right. But BWI - the official weather station for Baltimore, looks like the coolest place around at 3 p.m. Here's a sampling:

BWI Airport: 89
Sterling, Va.: 90
Martin Airport: 91
Washington, DC: 91
Annapolis: 91
Md. Science Ctr.: 94
Westminster: 97

Outside our region:
Dover, Del.: 90
Philadelphia: 91
Salisbury: 92
Norfolk: 91

Posted by Admin at 4:06 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: By the numbers
        

Relief is on the way

Yikes, it's nasty out there. Highs in the mid-90s today, with suffocating humidity and heat advisories. But relief is in the wings. Forecasters are calling for a frontal passage, with a chance of showers and thunderstorms through Thursday. The outlook is for highs in the 90s again tomorrow, but returning to the 70s by Thursday and continuing through Saturday. Overnight lows will sink to the 50s and 60s, so we'll be able to open the windows and cool things down without having to shell out to BGE. Whew!

Posted by Admin at 1:03 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Forecasts
        

June 13, 2005

Hot town, summer in the city

We're all facing temperatures in the lower 90s, and high humidity Tuesday afternoon, so the National Weather has issued a heat advisory for Maryland west of the Chesapeake Bay. The stifling humidity will make it harder for our bodies to cool themselves by evaporating sweat from our skin, so it seems hotter than it is. The "feels-like" temperature is also called the "heat index." Heat advisories are issued when the index exceeds 100 degrees. It should be called the "misery index."

So stay cool, and wear loose clothing and get a fan to move the air around if you don't have air conditioning. Forget about the daily mid-day jog. Drink plenty of fluids and wear light-colored clothing if you have go out in the mid-day sun. Or, why not just play hookey and spend the day at the movies or the mall.

These are the sorts of days that sent Washington's lawmakers home for the season in the days before AC. Maybe we were all better off then. It was also the sort of weather that sent Baltimoreans into the parks at night to sleep out under the stars, where it was at least a few degrees cooler than in their airless rowhouses. And there was the hope of a breeze. That's one tradition in Charm City that's not likely to be revived.

Posted by Admin at 9:06 PM | | Comments (1)
Categories: Forecasts
        

Ask Mr. WeatherBlogger: pools & lightning

Mr. Weatherblogger recently (OK, a week ago - it takes time to become an instant expert) received this query from reader Allyson Mattanah, who clearly is a fitness nut:

"Is there any danger to swimmers in an INDOOR pool during a thunderstorm? My health club closes their indoor pool during lightning, but it seems rather unnecessary. Please respond."

Frankly, it seemed kind of unnecessary to me, too. But not wanting to look dumb on the record when I can avoid it, I forwarded Allyson's question to David Manning, warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service's Sterling, Va. forecast office.

"You've got me on that one," Manning said. But he went to work and found us all an answer. More specifically, he referred us to the National Lightning Safety Institute Web page.

The bottom line: swimming pools - all swimming pools, whether indoors or out - are connected to the rest of the world by an extensive network of pipes and wires, all of which conduct electricity. And a lightning strike somewhere nearby could conceivably transmit a powerful jolt into the pool. Clearly, not a good place to be in a thunderstorm.

Curiously, the discussion on the National Lightning Safety Institute Website says there are no known reports of anyone being killed while swimming in an indoor pool during a lightning storm. But lighting strikes have destroyed circulation pumps and electrical boxes, and blown slides off their concrete footings. There are also plenty of reports of people in other storts of buildings being zapped while using telephones and other appliances. It's easy enough to put two and two together and recognize there has to be some risk to indoor swimmers.

So, the sensible advice would be to close the pool, get everyone out and wait for the storm to pass - at least 30 minutes after the last thunder is heard.

Posted by Admin at 11:58 AM | | Comments (2)
Categories: Ask Mr. Weatherblogger
        

June 10, 2005

Arlene's heavy rains move into U.S.

Looks like Tropical Storm Arlene will be getting everyone in the southeastern United States very wet this weekend. Heavy rains are already sweeping Florida (here's the soggy forecast for Tampa), and are expected to move through the Appalachians and into the Ohio Valley:

"HEAVY RAIN ASSOCIATED
WITH ARLENE WILL CONTINUE TO SPREAD NORTHWARD THROUGH THE
SOUTHEAST...SOUTHERN APPALACHIANS...TENNESSEE VALLEY AND OHIO
VALLEY THIS EVENING INTO THIS WEEKEND. STORM TOTAL PRECIPITATION OF
4 TO 8 INCHES IS EXPECTED ALONG AND TO THE EAST OF THE TRACK OF
ARLENE...WITH ISOLATED AMOUNTS UP TO 12 INCHES ALONG THE CENTRAL TO
EASTERN GULF COAST STATES."

Here's the rest of the advisory from the National Hurricane Center. The service has posted tropical storm warnings and a hurricane watch for the Gulf Coast between Louisiana and the Florida panhandle. The storm's maximum sustained winds have climbed to 65 mph, just 9 miles short of hurricane force. It is expected to strengthen, and could reach hurricane force before landfall.

Here is the satellite water vapor image. And here is a satellite photo, shot today, showing the storm clouds moving into the Southeast, ahead of the storm.

Posted by Admin at 6:45 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Hurricanes
        

Arlene moves into the Gulf

Tropical Storm Arlene is moving away from Cuba this morning, after dropping up to 15 inches of rain in the higher elevations. Maximum sustained winds have climbed to 55 mph, and while the storm is still poorly organized, winds are likely to increase some during the next 24 hours, forecasters say. Nobody seems to think Arlene will ever pull herself together enough to reach hurricane status - with sustained winds of 74 mph or more.

Heavy rains are already being felt in South Florida, north and east of the storm's center. Here's how it looks in Key West - plenty windy but no heavy rain yet. And tropical storm watches are posted for the north-central Gulf Coast.

Posted by Admin at 10:59 AM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Hurricanes
        

Broken weather record

No, not a new high or record rainfall. It's the broken record of endless days of heat, humidity and the threat of showers and thunderstorms. Ah, Baltimore in June.

The thunderstorms have been spotty. One of them stalled over Howard County yesterday evening and dropped several inches of rain. There was flash flooding on Cabin Branch. It flooded the intersection of Florence and Shaffersville roads, stranding a driver, who had to be rescued. Driving through flooded roads: bad idea. Turn around. Don't drown.

The forecast through Tuesday offers nothing but highs in the 80s and rain chances every day from 50 percent to 20 percent. Blame it all on another pesky Bermuda High. It's lurking off the Atlantic coast and pumping wet, tropical air into the region from the south. And it ain't going away.

Posted by Admin at 10:32 AM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Forecasts
        

June 9, 2005

Arlene is born in NW Caribbean

The first tropical storm of the 2005 Atlantic season - Arlene - has formed this morning in the northwest Caribbean. Ship reports have clocked its maximum sustained winds at more than 40 mph. It's still pretty disorganized, and forecasters at the National Hurricane Center don't seem to feel Arlene has much chance to become a hurricane. But you should never say never in the hurricane biz.

The storm is already sending heavy rain northward into western Cuba and beyond to Key West, Fla. The strike probabilities show the storm headed toward the northern Gulf coast, anywhere from Louisiana to the Florida panhandle.

Posted by Admin at 10:32 AM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Hurricanes
        

June 8, 2005

Season's first tropical depression forms

Just eight days into the new hurricane season, Tropical Depression 1, the first of the 2005 Atlantic season, has formed in the western Caribbean Sea. Highest sustained winds are just 30 mph, but forecasters expect it will reached tropical storm force, with winds of 39 mph or more, within 24 hours. If so, it will become Tropical Storm Arlene.

The initial strike-probability chart has the storm moving northward, between the Yucatan and Cuba, then on toward the Gulf coast, somewhere between Louisiana and Florida.

We're off an running on what forecasters have predicted will be a very active storm season.

Posted by Admin at 6:43 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Hurricanes
        

92 at BWI is hottest since July 5, 2004

Whew! We told you we'd all be wishing for that cool May weather again before too long. Well, the mercury touched 92 degrees briefly today at BWI. It is the first time the airport temperature has gone above 90 degrees since Aug. 20 last year, and the hottest it's been there since last July 5.

Needless to say it's also the hottest day since the cool May weather morphed into hot June weather on Sunday, the 5th. After 19 straight days of below-average temperatures, it was 88 that day, 90 the next, 88 again on Tuesday, and 92 today. No records broken, though. Today's high of 92 was 5 degrees short of the 97-degree mark set in 1999. The "normal" high for June 8 in Baltimore is 81 degrees.

Things get a bit better from here, with highs in the 80s and a chance of showers or thunderstorms through Saturday. But the summer switch has sure been flipped, and the season doesn't officially arrive until 2:48 a.m. on the 21st.

Posted by Admin at 6:05 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: By the numbers
        

Hurricane Center watching Caribbean storm

The National Hurricane Center is keeping an eye on rain and thunderstorms in the western Caribbean that could become the Atlantic season's first tropical storm - Arlene. The disturbances are associated with a low pressure system off the coast of Honduras. Hurricane spotter planes may be sent into the region later today.

Here's the morning line:

"CLOUDINESS AND SHOWERS OVER THE WESTERN CARIBBEAN SEA AND THE
ADJACENT LAND AREAS ARE PRIMARILY ASSOCIATED WITH A BROAD AREA OF
LOW PRESSURE NEAR THE COAST OF HONDURAS. THIS SYSTEM IS EXPECTED
TO MOVE SLOWLY NORTHWARD OVER THE NEXT COUPLE OF DAYS...AND
UPPER-LEVEL WINDS ARE FORECAST TO BECOME MORE FAVORABLE FOR SLOW
DEVELOPMENT. IF NECESSARY...AN AIR FORCE RESERVE UNIT
RECONNAISSANCE AIRCRAFT WILL INVESTIGATE THIS SYSTEM LATER TODAY."

Posted by Admin at 11:45 AM | | Comments (2)
Categories: Hurricanes
        

June 7, 2005

Venus is back

Long absent from the evening sky, the planet Venus is back, far enough away from the setting sun to be visible again. With the skies looking fairly clear for the next few days, you should be able to pick it out, low in the west, about 45 minutes after sunset (about 8:31 p.m.).

Venus will be joined Wednesday evening by a very slender crescent moon. By mid-month, tiny Mercury will join Venus in the evening sky. And Saturn, now well above and to the left of Venus, will move closer each night until all three planets are huddled in a bunch by June 25, less than 2 degrees apart. That's tight enough to hide behind your fingertip, held at arm's length.

So go for an evening walk. Take the kids and point out the planets. You might inspire a lifelong interest in backyard astronomy.

Posted by Admin at 5:06 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Sky Watching
        

New Hubble Heritage image released

It looks something like an angry goldfish, but astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope say it's a colorful remnant of an exploding star.

The star - 50 times the mass of our sun - blew up far from Earth, some 160,000 light years from our Milky Way galaxy. It's actually in the Earth's southern sky, part of the Large Magellanic Cloud visible to residents of South America, Africa and Australia.

The photo is this month's Hubble Heritage image. For a closer look, click here.

Posted by Admin at 3:16 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Cool pictures
        

A wild and crazy night

Charcoal skies, streaks of lightning across the heavens and a night of thunder. Was that cool, or what? The summer season's (okay, so it's not quite summer yet) first big thunderstorm left quite an impression and nearly an inch and a half of rain at BWI. There was plenty of wind damage, too. Trees down, power outages. Here's a partial list.

At BWI, the early-afternoon high temperature of 90 degrees was knocked down to 67 degrees by early evening. It fell from 83 to 70 in less than an hour, between 6 and 7 p.m. La Plata, down in Charles County, reported hail .88 inch in diameter. More than 30,000 BGE customers lost power; all but 6,000 were back on line at 2 p.m. today.

The forecast is for sunny skies today and tomorrow, and only a slight risk of thunderstorms through Friday. The weekend looks dry, with highs in the 80s. Perfect for cleaning up all those twigs and other storm debris and cutting the well-watered grass.

Posted by Admin at 2:53 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Events
        

June 6, 2005

Severe storm warnings for city, county

That's about as nasty a sky as we've seen around here in a long while. The National Weather Service has posted severe thunderstorm warnings for the city and Baltimore, Arundel and Harford counties, also Montgomery, Caroline, Kent and Queen Anne's. Hail the size of pennies and gusts to 60 mph or higher. Let's be careful out there.

If you manage any good storm photos after the danger has passed, we'd love to see them uploaded to our Reader's Photos section. If you haven't registered, just click on "register" in the upper right part of the page, and follow the directions.

Posted by Admin at 7:50 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Forecasts
        

Heat, humidity & haze

The folks out at the Smog Blog at UMBC have been looking out the window again. It's hot- nearly 90 - and the air is full of chemicals and high humidity. And it all adds up to summer-like haze.

Tomorrow's forecast calls for worsening air quality - "unhealthy" for people with particular sensitivities to ozone pollution, such as adults and children engaged in prolonged outdoor activities, and people with respiratory illnesses. For more, click here.

Posted by Admin at 3:25 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Cool pictures
        

Severe T-storm watch posted

The National Weather Service has posted a severe thunderstorm watch for most of Maryland this afternoon. Some storms are already bubbling up out of the heat and humidity in northern Virginia, and they're popping up on radar. There's even a possibility that tornadoes could break out. Here's how to prepare.

We don't usually think of Maryland as tornado country. But while the most powerful twisters are exceedingly rare here, the record books are full of serious, even deadly storms that have touched down over the years. Here's a list, by county.

Posted by Admin at 3:00 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Watches and warnings
        

Thunder boomers due today

Forecasters say there's better than a 50/50 chance of severe thunderstorms here this afternoon. That means a good chance of wind gusts over 58 mph, heavy downpours and dangerous lightning. Not that there's really any kind of "safe" lightning.

The advisories say the storms could arrive just as the evening commute is getting underway. So be careful out there.

There's no surprise here. Summer heat has finally arrived, and so has the humidity, pushing heat index readings into the mid-90s. And that's the formula for afternoon and evening thunderstorms. The next few days look fine, with the chance of thunderstorms resuming late in the week and into the weekend.

Posted by Admin at 12:05 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Forecasts
        

June 3, 2005

Scores killed, 200,000 homeless in China rains

Torrential rain in China - as much as 8 inches in 24 hours - has killed at least 88 people, forced hundreds of thousands from their homes and devastated vast tracts of farmland. Here's the story.

Posted by Admin at 7:39 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Flooding
        

The chill continues

May's chill continues to spill into June. Today's high looks like it will stick at about 64 degrees. That's 16 degrees below the average high of 79 degrees for a June 3 at BWI, and just 5 degrees warmer than the average low. It all adds up to the 19th straight day of below-average temperatures in Baltimore.

Since way back on April 22 we've had just 10 days that averaged above the 30-year mean for the date, versus 32 days with below-average temperatures. But don't knock it. Sometime in the middle of July our air conditioners will be sucking loudly at our wallets and we will be longing for a return to this kind of weather.

Posted by Admin at 5:08 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: By the numbers
        

Fires in Quebec near meteor crater

NASA's Aqua Earth-observing satellite yesterday snapped photos of heavy smoke from wildfires in the Quebec woods recently ignited by lightning. Some of the fires are burning just south of the famous Manicouagan meteor crater, which is visible in the right center of the photograph. Many Baltimoreans will recall the wood smoke from Canadian fires that drifted south into Maryland back in 2002.

But take a look at this satellite image. Enlarge it and scroll north of the ST. Lawrence River and the smoke on the right side of the image, you'll see a circular lake. That's the Manicouagan crater. Here's another view, in winter, and some discussion of the crater's history. And here is a gallery of images of the crater.

Geologists believe the crater, 40 miles wide, was formed by an impact more than 200 million years ago. It has been worn down since by erosion and glaciers, and is now filled by a lake that backed up behind a hydroelectric dam.

Here's the story that ran in The Sun July 8, 2002, about the Canadian fires and the smoke that blew all the way to Baltimore.

Northern haze blankets Md.
Smoke of Canadian fires drifts across mid-Atlantic


By Jonathan D. Rockoff
SUN STAFF

Section: TELEGRAPH Page: 1A
Edition: FINAL


© 2002 The Baltimore Sun


A haze smelling like burning wood blanketed much of Maryland yesterday as
summer winds carrying smoke from forest fires raging in Canada moved over the
state.
The ashen shroud from central Quebec is expected to linger over Maryland
through today, when, the National Weather Service predicts, winds will shift
and push the smoke over the Atlantic Ocean.
The unusual phenomenon does not pose serious health problems, though people
with asthma and other respiratory ailments were advised to be cautious and
limit time outdoors.
"I don't think there is anything intrinsically dangerous about forest-fire
smoke, but if you have respiratory problems, you don't want to exert
yourself," said Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, Baltimore's health commissioner.
Beilenson said that asthmatics should carry inhalers when outside and
runners should stop jogging if they experience any problems. "People ought to
be a little more cautious," Beilenson said, though he added that the smoke
isn't as dangerous as ozone.
The weather service said conditions did not warrant issuing an air quality
advisory. Area hospitals contacted yesterday said they have not seen an
increase in patients because of the weather.
The haze put views into a soft focus and reduced visibility at area
airports. Visibility, the weather service said, dropped to two miles at Martin
State Airport in Middle River and to three miles at Baltimore-Washington
International Airport.
But BWI spokeswoman April Thompson said the haze did not cause delays or
otherwise affect flights. "It's certainly something aircraft can handle, even
if visibility gets worse," she said.
Boaters on the Chesapeake Bay called the Coast Guard to ask what was
happening, as visibility dropped to a mile. "It's pretty much all over the
radio," said Petty Officer Brian Dietz in Baltimore. He said he did not know
of any accidents caused by weather conditions.
Visitors at Baltimore's Inner Harbor said they couldn't help but notice the
haze and smoky smell yesterday afternoon.
"It makes it seem like 8:30 at night," said Irma Fennessey, 65, of Essex,
who added that the haze had detracted from her walk around the sights with her
sister. Off in the distance, the National Aquarium was blurred. Looking
upward, Fennessey asked, "Where is that sun?"
The pall has been creeping down the Atlantic coast at 12,000 feet above sea
level for several days. Winds flowing from Canada brought the smoke first over
New England and then to the mid-Atlantic states. It reached as far south as
eastern Virginia and North Carolina, said Jackie Hale, a weather service
spokeswoman in Sterling, Va.
It blew into much of Maryland yesterday morning. Satellite images from the
afternoon showed that the thickest swath of smoke had at that time blanketed
most of the state.
Dave Jones, a meteorologist who is president and chief executive officer of
Storm Center Communications, an Ellicott City company that has a government
grant to use satellite imagery to explain weather, said a high-pressure system
hovering over the region was pushing the smoke and its odor down to the ground
so people could sense it.
"We haven't seen anything like this in a long time," Jones said. "It's more
common in the Midwest because our winds are usually from the west to the east,
and when they have forest fires in the Rocky Mountains, people can see it in
Nebraska, Kansas and Iowa."
Harford County police reported a deluge of calls from concerned and curious
residents, who had not seen advisories explaining the haze posted on the Web
and on cable television's Weather Channel.
People venturing outdoors thought it would rain, looked for a nearby fire
or worried about the health consequences.
"I wondered if we should be out walking in it," said Pearl Imber, 67, from
Pikesville, who decided to visit Fort McHenry and stroll around the Inner
Harbor with her husband, only to find the views obstructed.
The plume was expected to give sunset and sunrise a reddish hue, Hale said.
The spell should pass later today when a low-pressure system over Maine gives
way and shifting winds blow the smoke eastward, instead of south.
At least 50 forest fires about 500 miles north of Montreal are responsible
for the overcast conditions, the weather service said. The fires, sparked by
thunderstorms Tuesday and still burning, have consumed 375 square miles of
forest.
The Associated Press and Sun staff writer Jason Song contributed to this
article.

Posted by Admin at 12:13 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Cool pictures
        

Wetter today, better tomorrow

More than a half-inch of rain has fallen on downtown Baltimore since the showers and drizzle began in Baltimore after midnight. The precipitation chances hold at 100 percent all day, then fade to 80 percent tonight. But the weekend, while gray, will be drier, with only a 20 percent chance of rain. In all, the weather service says we can expect up to three-quarters of an inch of rain from this shot of Gulf moisture.

Here's a look at what has fallen so far around the region.

Posted by Admin at 11:48 AM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Forecasts
        

June 2, 2005

Chilly ocean air and high tides

A steady east wind is pumping cool, damp air in from the Atlantic Ocean today, making us wonder why we didn't bring a sweater or a jacket to work today. The wind is also blowing water in the Chesapeake Bay onto the Western Shore, adding a foot or two to the high tides today.

The weather pattern is the result of a low pressure system centered over Alabama spinning counter-clockwise to our south and west, coupled with high pressure off the New England coast that's spinning the other way. They act together to funnel east winds off the ocean and into our region.

And that's going to keep temperatures in the 60s today and tomorrow, with increasing chances of rain. Saturday will be warmer, but with a continuing risk of rain. Sunday looks better, with more sunshine and highs in the 80s.

Posted by Admin at 12:19 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Forecasts
        

June 1, 2005

Small quake jiggles upstate New York

Residents living near Massena and Plattsburgh in far northern New York State were rattled by a small (magnitude 2.9) earthquake at about 9:49 a.m. yesterday. Such quakes are not uncommon in the St. Lawrence River region. Some have been attributed to the "rebound" of the Earth's crust, which was pushed down by the weight of glaciers during the last Ice Age more than 12,000 years ago. The ice has long-since melted away, but the land is still rising.

Posted by Admin at 4:58 PM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Events
        

Wetter weather ahead

Forecasters say a succession of lows - first off the coast, then moving north and east from the Gulf, and finally east from the Ohio Valley - will conspire to shove aside the nice high-pressure dome that has kept things nice for several days, and wet our weather for the rest of the week.

Here's AccuWeather's take on it.

Tomorrow (Thursday) looks to be the worst of it, with a 70 percent chance of rain through the day. The rain chances will persist through Saturday, with a total accumulation of as much as an inch. Temps will stick in the 60s and 70s until the sunshine returns on Sunday, pushing the mercury into the 80s.

Posted by Admin at 11:37 AM | | Comments (0)
Categories: Forecasts
        
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About Frank Roylance
This site is the Maryland Weather archive. The current Maryland Weather blog can be found here.
Frank Roylance is a reporter for The Baltimore Sun. He came to Baltimore from New Bedford, Mass. in 1980 to join the old Evening Sun. He moved to the morning Sun when the papers merged in 1992, and has spent most of his time since covering science, including astronomy and the weather. One of The Baltimore Sun's first online Web logs, the Weather Blog debuted in October 2004. In June 2006 Frank also began writing comments on local weather and stargazing for The Baltimore Sun's print Weather Page. Frank also answers readers’ weather queries for the newspaper and the blog. Frank Roylance retired in October 2011. Maryland Weather is now being updated by members of The Baltimore Sun staff
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